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Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association Welcomes the City of Oconomowoc, WI, to its Century Club

Jan 7, 2022
Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association
PRNewswire
BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Jan. 7, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association welcomes the City of Oconomowoc, WI, to its Century Club in recognition of its long use of cast iron pipes in its water distribution system.
BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Jan. 7, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association welcomes the City of Oconomowoc, WI, to its Century Club in recognition of its long use of cast iron pipes in its water distribution system.
"The Century Club honors utilities that invested in cast iron pipes to provide safe drinking to their communities 100 years ago," said Patrick J. Hogan, president of the association, known as DIPRA. "Today's modern Ductile iron pipe is the natural descendant of cast iron, exhibiting the increased strength and resilience needed to withstand changing weather conditions, soil consistency and even natural disasters. We're proud to welcome the City of Oconomowoc into the Century Club and commend their utility professionals and others tasked with overseeing their water system for their commitment to the health and safety of their community."
There are 546 water utilities in the United States and 34 water utilities in Canada that are members of the Century Club. Many of these utilities are all still using at least some of the cast iron pipes installed underground more than 100 years ago. DIPRA also sponsors a Sesquicentennial Club of which 25 utilities in the U.S. and four in Canada are known to have enjoyed cast iron pipelines in service for more than 150 years.
The City of Oconomowoc uses either Ductile or cast iron in most of its 99 miles of water mains, with pipe sizes ranging from 4 to 16-inches.
Breaks in Ductile iron pipes happen much less frequently than with substitute materials, such as plastic PVC pipes. In explaining their choice to use Ductile iron in their water system, Oconomowoc Water Superintendent Scott Osborn, P.E., said Ductile leaks are small and "very localized as opposed to the longitudinal break on PVC pipe causing a bigger scope of clean up and restoration."
DIPRA Regional Director Paul H. Hanson, P.E., presented a plaque to the Oconomowoc City Council in October.
SOURCE Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association (DIPRA)
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